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Welcome to the Finger Lakes Bone & Joint Center

Orthopedic Surgeons Serving Rochester NY & The Finger Lakes Region

For orthopedic surgery that can repair and restore function to limbs and joints, Finger Lakes Bone and Joint Center is a talent in preventative and rehabilitative procedures. For sports injury, neck pain, joint pain and a range of other debilitating symptoms, Finger Lakes Bone and Joint Center is your best chance in the Finger Lakes, NY region for top tier joint replacement and orthopedic surgery.

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Joint Commission National Quality Approval Seal
Newark-Wayne Community Hospital named Orthopedic Joint Center of Excellence by Joint Commission! Congratulations to the surgeons, surgical team, and staff at Newark-Wayne Community Hospital for achieving The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval® for its total knee and hip replacement program. Newark-Wayne now joins Rochester General, Unity, and United Memorial Medical Center as Rochester Regional Health’s fourth accredited Orthopedic Joint Center of Excellence. The Joint Commission Gold Seal is a symbol of Newark-Wayne’s commitment to providing safe and effective patient care. Thanks to everyone involved for their dedication and hard work in achieving this incredible milestone!

Recent News

Could new bone-forming growth factor reverse osteoporosis?

February 7, 2017 / 0 comments

Scientists at the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern in Dallas, TX, have uncovered a new bone-forming growth factor that may reverse the bone loss associated with osteoporosis. They say that this discovery has implications for regenerative medicine.

[bone fracture of the spine]
Osteolectin has been shown to promote bone growth in postmenopausal mice.

Osteoporosis develops over several years and is a condition that weakens bones. This weakness makes bones more fragile and susceptible to breakages. More than 50 million people in the United States aged 50 and older are affected by osteoporosis or low bone mass.

Treatments for osteoporosis currently involve treating and preventing bone fractures, as well as using medication to strengthen bones. Bisphosphonates are drugs that slow down or prevent bone damage. Estrogen therapy is also used in some groups of people to help maintain bone density.

While the majority of existing treatments for osteoporosis reduce the rate of bone loss, they do not promote new bone growth. There is one agent, called Teriparatide (PTH), that is approved for the formation of new bone. However, the use of PTH is limited to only 2 years due to a risk of developing osteosarcoma (bone cancer).

The researchers at the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute (CRI) at UT Southwestern called the newly discovered bone-forming growth factor Osteolectin, or Clec11a, and they published their findings in eLife.

Dr. Sean Morrison – CRI director, Mary McDermott Cook Chair in Pediatric Genetics, and the Kathryne and Gene Bishop Distinguished Chair in Pediatric Research – led the study.

Particular bone marrow and bone cells have been found to produce Osteolectin. The team at CRI say they are the first to demonstrate that Osteolectin promotes new bone formation from skeletal stem cells in the bone marrow.

Osteolectin significantly increased bone volume, reversed bone loss

Morrison and colleagues discovered that when Osteolectin was deleted in mice, they experienced acceleration in bone loss during adulthood. The mice also exhibited symptoms of osteoporosis, such as diminished bone strength and the delayed healing of fractures.

The researchers aimed to find out whether it was possible for Osteolectin to reverse bone loss after osteoporosis had developed. Morrison and team used two groups of mice that had their ovaries removed to mimic the type of osteoporosis that develops in postmenopausal women. They provided the mice with a daily injection of either PTH or Osteolectin.

When compared with PTH – an agent already proven to promote bone formation – Osteolectin showed similar results. Compared with untreated mice, the bone volume in both PTH-treated and Osteolectin-treated mice had significantly increased.

Both treatments were shown to successfully reverse the bone loss that occurred as a result of ovary removal.

“These results demonstrate the important role Osteolectin plays in new bone formation and maintaining adult bone mass. This study opens up the possibility of using this growth factor to treat diseases like osteoporosis,” says Morrison.

“These early results are encouraging, suggesting Osteolectin might one day be a useful therapeutic option for osteoporosis and in regenerative medicine.”

Dr. Sean Morrison

Morrison is also the principle investigator for the Hamon Laboratory for Stem Cell and Cancer Biology. Alongside the Hamon Laboratory scientists, Morrison plans to conduct further experiments to test Osteolectin’s therapeutic potential.

The team’s objective is to identify the receptor for Osteolectin, which they say will help them to understand the signaling mechanism that the growth factor uses to promote the formation of bone.

 

Avoiding knee or hip surgery

February 7, 2017 / 0 comments

Losing weight, strengthening muscles, and increasing flexibility may help you stave off joint replacement.

You may be putting off a doctor visit to address knee or hip osteoarthritis because you believe it will end with joint replacement surgery, but that’s not always the case. “Exercise and weight loss are actually the first line of defense,” says Dr. Eric Berkson, director of the Sports Performance Center at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. “It may help prevent the pain and prevent surgery.”

Physical therapy

The main component of joint surgery avoidance is strengthening the muscles that support your joints. The quadriceps in the front of the thigh and the hamstrings in the back are key to knee strength. “Every time you walk or run or do anything weight-bearing, the quads absorb the shock. The stronger your quads are, the less load that gets transferred into the joint,” says David Nolan, a physical therapist atMassachusetts General Hospital.

To build quad strength, you’ll start exercising while lying down: tightening your quads with your leg out in front of you, or lying on your stomach and raising your foot into the air to strengthen your hamstrings. You’ll progress to standing exercises such as leg lifts and curls, and graduate to exercising on weight machines.

The gluteal muscles in the buttocks and flexors in the pelvis are important for hip strength and flexibility. To beef them up, you’ll start with a number of different leg lifts, such as extensions and clamshells, before progressing to exercises on weight machines.

Stretching is important to keep the muscles flexible. Nolan recommends doing this after exercising. “Exercising first brings more blood flow to the area and makes the muscle more amenable to change,” he explains.

You’ll see a change in your muscles after four to six weeks of daily exercises. Then you can move to rigorous exercises two to three times a week, but you can never go back to a nonactive lifestyle. “Doing this doesn’t restore cartilage. If you stop, you’ll go back to the way you felt before,” says Nolan.

Weight loss

The force you place on your joints can be up to six times your weight, so shedding pounds can reduce that pressure. “If you’re 10 pounds overweight, it’s 30 to 60 pounds of pressure on every step. Even a 10-pound weight loss can make a huge difference,” says Dr. Berkson. But don’t jump into a drastic diet plan. You’ll have to work with a dietitian to reduce calories but ensure you’re getting the baseline of what your body needs to build muscle and keep up your energy. A typical guideline is 130 grams (g) per day of carbohydrates for both men and women, and 56 g of protein per day for men, 46 g of protein per day for women.

Chondroitin and glucosamine supplements may help as well, although research has provided mixed results. Chondroitin sulfate helps to keep cartilage from deteriorating. Glucosamine stimulates cartilage formation and repair. Dr. Berkson says they take at least four weeks to be effective, and the supplements don’t work for everyone.

There’s no guarantee that a program of weight loss and muscle strengthening will help everyone avoid joint surgery, either. But both experts say the approach is an important alternative. “I can definitely say I’ve had a number of patients who’ve canceled or delayed surgeries by doing this,” says Nolan.Hip Extension Hip Extension
Once you’re strong enough, your PT may suggest strengthening glutes with hip extensions. Stand behind a sturdy chair. Hold the back for balance, bend your trunk forward 45 degrees. Slowly raise your right leg as high as possible without bending your knee. Pause. Slowly lower the leg. Aim for eight to 12 repetitions. Repeat with your left leg. Rest and repeat the sets.Exercise illustrations by Matthew Holt
Dumbbell Squat
Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart. Hold a weight in each hand with your arms at your sides and palms facing inward.
Slowly bend your knees about eight inches. Keep your back slightly arched. Pause.
Slowly rise to an upright position. Do eight
to 12 repetitions. Rest and repeat the set.
Dumbbell Squat

How To Build a Bionic Hand

February 7, 2017 / 0 comments

The Doctor behind the latest orthopedic surgical procedure explains history behind the technique of building bionic hands.

Last month, a team of surgeons in Vienna reported on their experience replacing injured hands in three patients with a mind-controlled prosthesis dubbed a “bionic hand.” In this article, the team leader tells some of the backstory.

For about 25 years, I have been dealing with patients with all sorts of nerve injuries. The most devastating are those whose brachial plexus has been severely injured. My very first teacher in nerve surgery, Prof. Hanno Millesi, taught me the art of nerve reconstruction, and even in the worst-case scenarios, he seemed to have a solution, whether these were anatomical reconstructions using nerve grafts, intra- and extraplexual nerve transfers, or secondary reconstructions using tendon transfers, tenodesis, or arthrodesis.

However, with time I realized that there is an unfortunate group of patients in whom, for various reasons, biologic reconstructions would not result in any meaningful hand function. The hands of these patients presented a biologic wasteland, beyond the hope of ever being repaired given existing reconstructive methods.

Some years later I got involved in a research project to improve control mechanisms in prosthetic limbs. The research and development department of the prosthetic company was just a few subway stops away from the university campus, and thus an exciting collaboration developed. Quickly, I realized that mechatronic hands have tremendous capabilities, and if the biotechnological interface could be improved, could indeed provide substantial help to the patients who had little or no hand function.

A normal upper extremity is supplied with about 250,000 nerve fibers with about 10% being dedicated to moving the arm and hand. If these are either torn out of the spinal cord or damaged somewhere along the way, the arm and hand will become paralyzed. Even if some motor fibers will eventually make it to the forearm and hand after reconstructive surgery, in many cases the muscles there have undergone irreversible atrophy and fibrosis.

Thus these regenerated nerve fibers will not be able to provide enough power to move a stiff hand. But even then, they may still transmit signals that are intuitive and intimately connected with hand movement.

Since the muscles in the forearm had withered irreversibly, and the language and signal intensity of these nerves could not be read by electronic sensors, we transplanted fresh muscle from other parts of the body as a translator and bioamplifier of these faint nerve signals. Once these axons made successful contact and the muscle started to contract, patients began a process called TechNeuroRehabilitation to train their brain.

Since some patients had not thought of controlling their hand for many years, the corresponding central motor centers also needed to be strengthened. This process was mediated by virtual reality or with real, but temporary, prosthetic means. This alone provided a tremendous motivation for the patients, as they realized that they could, in fact, move a hand with just the power of thought alone.

When Milo came to my office in the fall of 2009 for a follow-up examination after a global plexus injury about 8 years earlier and a number of reconstructive surgeries, he had good shoulder and elbow function but very poor forearm and hand function. He asked what else could be done to improve this poor state of affairs.

As luck would have it, we had just started to begin the exploration of the bionic reconstruction concept, and thus I invited him to come to our lab to see whether we could identify some myoelectric signals that could be useful for prosthetic control. And indeed, even that day we were able to identify two distinct signals which he could use to control a virtual hand.

A few months later, and after a considerable amount of discussion and hybrid hand training, both Milo and myself were convinced that a prosthetic hand replacement was the right path to pursue.

Today, 5 years later, he tells me that losing his hand was beyond a shadow of a doubt the right decision. I saw him again just a few days ago about 15 years after the initial accident and was, once more, thankful for having the opportunity of bionic extremity reconstruction.

Originally published in Med Page Today

Written by Oskar C. Aszmann MD

 

Using the Nose to Repair the Knee?

February 7, 2017 / 0 comments

Repair of trauma-associated cartilage injuries in the knee was feasible and safe using autologous cartilage tissue derived from nasal chondrocytes, Swiss researchers reported.

In a first-in-human phase I study, engineered tissue grafts grown from nasal septum biopsy specimens were successfully secured in the damaged joint in 10 symptomatic patients, and over the course of 2 years, the repair tissue gradually assumed the composition of native cartilage, according to Ivan Martin, PhD, and colleagues from University Hospital Basel.

In addition, mean clinical scores for symptoms, pain, and activities of daily living gradually improved, the researchers reported in the Lancet.

Injuries to articular cartilage are painful and disabling, and can ultimately lead to osteoarthritis (OA) and a need for costly joint replacement.

 

To assess the feasibility and safety of their novel tissue-based approach, the researchers enrolled 10 patients from 2012 to 2016 who had trauma-induced cartilage lesions ranging from 2 to 6 cm2, located on the femoral condyle or trochlea.

Eight of the patients were men, ages ranged from 19 to 52, and symptom duration ranged from 6 months to 16 years.

Harvesting of the chondrocytes involved a Killian incision in the septum under local anesthesia and obtaining autologous cartilage of 6-mm diameter. In addition, 72 ml of blood was obtained for preparation of serum.

There were no adverse events at the site of tissue biopsy. Over the 24 months of follow-up, two serious adverse events occurred, with one being an injury to the opposite knee and the second being the appearance of new defects at other sites in the same joint.

“In our small cohort of patients for this phase I study, despite the variable degree of defect filling, self-assessment scores and MRI quantitative analyses established a satisfactory clinical outcome and a gradually improving quality of repair tissue over time,” Martin and colleagues wrote.

In an accompanying comment, Nicole Rotter, MD, and Rolf E. Brenner, MD, of the University of Ulm in Germany, wrote that the study “represents an important advance towards less invasive, cell-based repair technologies for articular cartilage defects, because the site of tissue harvest is not located within the healthy part of a joint, avoiding potential side effects of harvesting.”

 

 

Edited by FLBJC for brevity.
See the original, published in Med Page Today
by Nancy Walsh
Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today

Fibula Fracture: Symptoms, Treatment, and Recovery

February 7, 2017 / 0 comments

The fibula and tibia are the two long bones of the lower leg. The fibula, or calf bone, is a small bone located on the outside of the leg. The tibia, or shinbone, is the weight-bearing bone and is in the inside of the lower leg.

The fibula and the tibia join together at the knee and ankle joints. The two bones help to stabilize and support the ankle and lower leg muscles.

A fibula fracture is used to describe a break in the fibula bone. A forceful impact, such as landing after a high jump or any impact to the outer aspect of the leg, can cause a fracture. Even rolling or spraining an ankle puts stress on the fibula bone, which can lead to a fracture.

Contents of this article:

  1. Types of fibula fracture
  2. Treatment
  3. Rehab and physical therapy

Types of fibula fracture

Fibula fractures can happen at any point on the bone and can vary in severity and type. Types of fibula fracture include the following:

The fibula bone is the smaller of the two leg bones and is sometimes called the calf bone.
  • Lateral malleolus fractures occur when the fibula is fractured at the ankle
  • Fibular head fractures occur at the upper end of the fibula at the knee
  • Avulsion fractures happen when a small chunk of bone that is attached to a tendon or ligament is pulled away from the main part of the bone
  • Stress fractures describe a situation where the fibula is injured as the result of repetitive stress, such as running or hiking
  • Fibular shaft fractures occur in the mid-portion of the fibula after an injury such as a direct blow to the area

A fibula fracture can be due to many different injuries. It is commonly associated with a rolled ankle but can also be due to an awkward landing, a fall, or a direct blow to the outer lower leg or ankle.

Fibula fractures are common in sports, especially those that involve running, jumping, or quick changes of direction such as football, basketball, and soccer.

Symptoms

Pain, swelling, and tenderness are some of the most common signs and symptoms of a fractured fibula. Other signs and symptoms include:

  • Inability to bear weight on the injured leg
  • Bleeding and bruising in the leg
  • Visible deformity
  • Numbness and coldness in the foot
  • Tender to the touch

Diagnosis

People who have injured their leg and are experiencing any of the symptoms should consult a doctor for a diagnosis. The following steps occur during the diagnosis process:

  • Physical examination: A thorough examination will be conducted and the doctor will look for any noticeable deformities
  • X-ray: These are used to see the fracture and see if a bone has been displaced
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): This type of test provides a more detailed scan and can generate detailed pictures of the interior bones and soft tissues

Bone scans, computerized tomography (CT), and other tests may be ordered to make a more precise diagnosis and judge the severity of the fibula fracture.

Treatment

Simple and compound fibula fractures are classified depending on whether the skin has been broken or the bone is exposed.

Treatment for a fibula fracture can vary and depends greatly on how severe the break is. A fracture is classified as open or closed.

Open fracture (compound fracture)

In an open fracture, either the bone pokes through the skin and can be seen or a deep wound exposes the bone through the skin.

Open fractures are often the result of a high-energy trauma or direct blow, such as a fall or motor vehicle collision. This type of fracture can also occur indirectly such as with a high-energy twisting type of injury.

The force required to cause these types of fractures means that patients will often receive additional injuries. Some injuries could be potentially life-threatening.

According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, there is a 40 to 70 percent rate of associated trauma elsewhere within the body.

Doctors will treat open fibula fractures immediately and look for any other injuries. Antibiotics will be administered to prevent infection. A tetanus shot will also be given if necessary.

The wound will be cleaned thoroughly, examined, stabilized, and then covered so that it can heal. An open reduction and internal fixation with plate and screws may be necessary to stabilize the fracture. If the bones are not uniting, a bone graft may be necessary to promote healing.

Closed fracture (simple fracture)

In a closed fracture, the bone is broken, but the skin remains intact

The goal of treating closed fractures is to put the bone back in place, control the pain, give the fracture time to heal, prevent complications, and restore normal function. Treatment begins with the elevation of the leg. Ice is used to relieve the pain and reduce swelling.

If no surgery is needed, crutches are used for mobility and a brace, cast, or walking boot is recommended while healing takes place. Once the area has healed, individuals can stretch and strengthen weakened joints with the help of a physical therapist.

There are two main types of surgery if a patient requires them:

  • Closed reduction involves realigning the bone back to its original position without the need to make an incision at the fracture site
  • Open reduction and internal fixation realigns the fractured bone to its original position using hardware such as plates, screws, and rods

The ankle will be placed into a cast or fracture boot until the healing process is complete.

Rehab and physical therapy

After being in a cast or splint for several weeks, most people find that their leg is weak and their joints stiff. Most patients will require some physical rehabilitation to make sure their leg regains full strength and flexibility.

Some physical therapy may be required to regain full strength in a person’s leg.

A physical therapist will evaluate each person individually to determine the best treatment plan. The therapist may take several measurements to judge the individual’s condition. Measurements include:

  • Range of motion
  • Strength
  • Surgical scar tissue assessment
  • How the patient walks and bears weight
  • Pain

Physical therapy usually begins with ankle strengthening and mobility exercises. Once the patient is strong enough to put weight on the injured area, walking and stepping exercises are common. Balance is a vital part of regaining the ability to walk unassisted. Wobble board exercises are a great way to work on balance.

Many people are given exercises that they can do at home to further help with the healing process.

Long-term recovery

Proper treatment and rehabilitation supervised by a doctor increases the chance the person will regain full strength and motion. To prevent fibula fractures in the future, individuals who participate in high-risk sports should wear the appropriate safety equipment.

People can reduce their fracture risk by:

  • Wearing appropriate footwear
  • Following a diet full of calcium-rich foods such as milk, yogurt, and cheese to help build bone strength
  • Doing weight-bearing exercises to help strengthen bones

Possible complications

Fractured fibulas typically heal with no further problems, but the following complications are possible:

  • Degenerative or traumatic arthritis
  • Abnormal deformity or permanent disability of the ankle
  • Long-term pain
  • Permanent damage to the nerve and blood vessels around the ankle joint
  • Abnormal pressure buildup within the muscles around the ankle
  • Chronic swelling of the extremity

Most fractures of the fibula do not have any serious complications. Within a few weeks to several months, most patients make a full recovery and can continue their normal activities.

 

3 Easy Yoga Moves For The New Year

January 11, 2017 / 0 comments

This year you’re going to manage your back and joint pain in a proactive manner!

How?

Yoga.

Yoga has outlasted Jazzercise, Bowflex, and Tae Bo because it’s actually that good. When B.K.S. Iyengar brought yoga to the States with his book Light on Yoga, his message was clear: yoga was for everyone. That includes people with joint pain, back problems, insomnia, respiratory problems, and more. In fact, here are a few very basic yoga poses you can take into the new year and beyond:

 

Tadasana (or Mountain Pose)

 Image Credit: Amanda Rose Wellness

 

This pose is so straight forward and common you wouldn’t even know you were doing yoga.

Mountain Pose, or Tadasana (ta-da-sah-nah) in sanskrit, is the starting position of all standing yoga poses. A good pose to start your morning, stand with bare feet together. A wall makes an excellent prop, as it will help align the rest of the pose more easily. If a wall is in use, make certain the heels are backed against the wall.

Stretch the arms along the sides of the body, fingers pointed to the floor. Stretch the neck upward, like a string is attached to the top of the head and it’s lifting you up. Using this visual helps keep the neck muscles soft and unengaged.

Keep your head erect and look straight forward, face relaxed. An easy way to tell if the face is relaxed is to scrunch it up tightly and then let it go. Distribute the weight evenly over the feet, turn in the front of the thighs, pull in the lower abdomen and lift the chest. Again, imagine a string is attached to the heart and it’s pulling upwards.

Once Mountain Pose is attained, breath evenly and with awareness. This is a great time to feel the chest expand and even pop some of those vertebrae in the back on a deep inhale. Stay in this pose for 30 seconds to a full minute.

The benefits will be obvious: this pose, when given strict attention, helps correct incorrect posture, strengthens the knee joints, reduces sciatic pain, and overall helps lift and tone the pelvis and abdomen.

To get even more out of the pose, on an inhale, you may stretch the arms upwards with fingers pointing towards the sky, palms facing forward. This is Tadasana Urdhva Hastasana (Mountain Pose with Arms Stretched Up).

Another alteration is Tadasana Urdhva Baddhanguliyasana (Mountain Pose with Fingers Interlocked). From Tadasana, bring the hands together in front of the chest and interlock the fingers, then lift the arms towards the sky, palms facing the sky.

That one was easy and most likely something you’ve already been doing. Let’s do something a little more yogic.

 

Adhomukha Svanasana (or Downward Facing Dog)

 Image Credit: Pinterest

 

This pose rocks. It is such a basic pose, but the benefits are outstanding: it’s a beautiful back stretch, excellent post run stretch, and relieves stiffness all over. As mentioned, it’s a basic pose, but even advanced yogis continue to work and refine Adhomukha Svanasana (ah-doh-moo-kuh ss-va-nah-sah-nah) because it is a pose that can always get better. Let’s break it down.

 

For the beginner, it’s good to start on hands and knees on a yoga mat or harder floor–something that will allow your hands and bare feet to stick to it. Beginning from a table pose with knees directly under the hips and hands directly under the shoulders (it’s OK to look to make certain your stance isn’t too wide, which is very common the first several months of practicing, so best to prevent that), curl the toes under so they have a grip on the floor. Walk the hands out about 4 inches, spread the fingers wide, and on an exhale, push up.

 

Once in the pose, the hands will be pressed firmly into the floor and most likely you will be up on toes and buttocks up in the air. Begin to stretch out the calves by pressing one heel towards the floor, then the other. Be particularly gentle if this is the first stretch of the day, and a little more ambitious if this is the last stretch after a workout or run. The goal is to loosen up the hamstrings and warm them up. This can take a bit of “pedaling,” as it’s called. Once loosened, focus on pushing both heels towards the floor. The natural response will be to lift up on the toes, but then if we just did what felt natural, that wouldn’t be a very good stretch, would it? Remember to breathe.

 

This might be enough for some beginners. If so, skip to the last step. Ultimately, the pose always has the next work-to. With the weight distributed evenly in the hands and the heels pushing towards the ground, the next thing could be to push the chest towards the thighs. This helps loosen the back even more and straightens out the spine. While pushing the chest towards the thighs, this will help move the ears back behind the elbows, which this move also helps straighten and elongate the spine. Also, this will cause the rear to lift, which again will help elongate the spine. Remember to breathe. Once the pose is set, you will resemble a dog in a stretch.

 

Aim to mimic a dog in a stretch. This is an excellent way to remember good posture. For instance, remember to not keep your feet too close together or too far apart; a dog does not have its feet directly together for the stretch, but rather the feet are about hips width apart. This is good for us humans as well. There’s also a beautiful slope to the back which stretches it out. We want that too. The only difference I’ve noticed is while dogs tend to keep their heads up while in this stretch, humans want to keep their heads down with ears behind the elbows. If this is a bit difficult, a yoga block or other support for the head to rest on is a wonderful prop to help prevent headaches.

 

To come out of the pose, simply come back to the knees and bring the hands back under the shoulders, and sit up. And breathe.

Uttansana (or, Intense Forward Stretch)

 Image Credit: Yoga Journal

 

Back to a standing pose, Intense Forward Stretch, or Uttanasana (oo-tan-ah-sah-nah), will do wonders for everyone. The only exception is if you have spinal disk disorders, then stop when prompted, and make certain your spine is concave throughout this pose. Otherwise, this pose is for all practitioners!

 

Begin in Tadasana (Mountain Pose) and move into Tadasana Urdhva Hastasana (Mountain Pose with Arms Stretched Up). Take one or two focused breaths here. Feel free to shift the feet to hips width apart, just a couple inches should do it.

 

Exhale and bend forward at the hip with a straight back. Keep the legs stretched and maintain the body weight distributed evenly throughout the feet. Bending at the hips always, work to place the palms of your hands on the floor directly in front of your feet. Remember to keep the knees engaged and back straight. If you have a spinal disk disorder, you have done beautifully! Skip to the last step!

 

For everyone else, once the hands have been placed on the ground, the next work-to is move the hands back and place them next to the heels. Exhale and push the torso closer to the thighs until the face rests on the knees. The chin should not touch the chest, that is too much bend on the spine. Hold this pose for 30 seconds while practicing controlled breathing.

 

On an inhale, carefully lift again at the hips and bring yourself up, hands reaching towards the sky, and on an exhale, bring the arms back down.

 

It’s incredible to know this is yoga, right? These poses are excellent for relieving back pain and a myriad of other symptoms. Of course, it’s important to know you’re practicing yoga safely and the way it’s supposed to be performed so as to deliver the best results. Consider signing up for a yoga class at your gym or even dropping into a yoga studio where a professional yoga teacher can make any necessary adjustments for the best results. And of course, as with pursuing any different course of physical activity, particularly when you’ve had bone or joint problems, consult your doctor at the Finger Lakes Bone and Joint Center to make certain your yoga practice is working as it should for your overall bone and joint health.

 

 

Resource:s:

B.K.S Iyengar Yoga: The Path to Holistic Health. DK Publishing. 2014.

“Standing Forward Bend.” Yoga Journal. Date Accessed 29 Dec 2016. http://www.yogajournal.com/pose/standing-forward-bend/

Iyengar, B. K. S. Light on Yoga. London, Unwin, 1982.

 

 

 

Buying The Right Shoes For Joint Health

October 24, 2016 / 0 comments

Sometimes people like to be thrifty, and who can blame them? It feels good to save money on groceries here, find a really good back to school sale there, however, there is one place where we really don’t want to skimp. A good rule of thumb is: if you have to spend extra money, it should go to anything that comes between you and the ground. This means dropping some decent dough on mattresses, tires, and especially shoes.

When it comes to choosing your next pair of shoes, there are quite a few things to consider.

Think how much of a beating our feet take on a daily basis! In addition to the weight our feet are bearing to begin with, consider the force we put on them whenever we’re walking. An average person takes about 4,000 to 6,000 steps a day, and even a sedentary person can still take about 1,000-3,000 steps per day. All of that pressure created by taking steps bears down on our foot bones, which sends shocks back up our bodies that can be felt in our knees, hips, and back. The best way to prevent this foot, knee, hip and back pain is to spend a little extra money on something good to put between you and the ground. That’s why we stress investing in good shoes.

Each person has a different foot pattern and arch. Some people are flat footed, others have high arches, and some have medium arches. Some people place their weight on one side of the foot or the other, or perhaps they land on the ball of their foot rather than the heel. Maybe they land completely flat! Everyone has their own unique way of walking, and shoe companies are happy to celebrate that difference! That’s why all major sports brands make and carry different types of sport-specific shoes for different types of people.

Understand why you’re buying your shoes. Is this for a specific sport? Do you need casual wear?

The easiest way to find out which shoe is right for you is to visit a specialty shoe store. Shoe stores that deal specifically in athletic shoes are a good start, such as Feet Fleet or a local athletic store (aofas.org). Typically, the staff will be trained to identify different strides, read wear patterns on your current shoes (so bring a well-used pair on your visit), and understand what kind of support you need depending on your step. If you’re looking for a certain sport shoe, then absolutely purchase a shoe that is specifically designed for that sport and stick to it. For example, if you were to tell an employee that you’re experiencing hip pain while running, they would be able to find a few running shoe types for you to test. The shoe will be specifically supported so that when your foot hits the ground, the shoe will better absorb the shock from hitting your hips, relieving that pain. Also, give the employees a chance to measure your foot. While adult feet do tend to stop growing, they do continue to spread. Some people can experience up to a two size increase because of the way their feet have matured!

Again, let a staff member at a shoe store know about any pain you’re experiencing so they can bring you appropriate footwear to adjust for that peculiarity you’re experiencing. Are you purchasing shoes for work or dress? Seek out a specialty shoe store that also trains their staff to identify foot support needs in their customers. They’ll often have quality brands that are specifically manufactured for orthopedic support while also looking stylish. Yes, we can now have both–the future is amazing! Consider these brands when looking for dress and casual shoes:

And there are plenty more once you begin looking!

When purchasing high heels, it’s especially important to buy quality shoes. Because high heels are created the way they are, the stress created between the foot and the leg bones can more readily lead to stress fractures. High heels also lead to higher rates of toenail deformities, sprains and strains, bunions and hammertoes, and causes heel pain in general. Preferably, avoid high heels where possible.

As always, if you’re experiencing pain in the foot, knee, hips, or back, schedule an appointment with the Finger Lakes Bone and Joint Center so we can understand what course of action is right for you. Proper foot care is an important step, but it’s always best to check with a doctor before starting out on your own workout regimen or abrupt change in footwear.

References:

“Footwear.” FootcareMD. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society. http://www.aofas.org/footcaremd/how-to/footwear/Pages/default.aspx

Podiatrist Shoe Recommendations. Suffern Podiatry. https://suffernpodiatry.com/shoe-brand-recomendations/

“10,000 Steps a Day.” The Walking Site. http://www.thewalkingsite.com/10000steps.html

Elliot, Candice. “Quality vs. Cost.” Listen Money Matters. https://www.listenmoneymatters.com/quality-vs-cost/

Benefits of Calcium Supplements

September 7, 2016 / 0 comments

For decades, we have been bombarded with information that calcium is good for your bones, that we all need milk for its calcium and vitamin D, and once we get older we need to take calcium supplements—eat all the calcium! But why?

All cells in the human body need calcium, not just bones and teeth. A healthy heart, strong muscles, and quick reflexes all require calcium (Martin “Calcium Blood Test”).

As patients become more involved and conscious of their diet and health care, they find themselves asking “Why should I take calcium supplements? Can’t I get enough calcium from a good diet? What do calcium supplements do for me?”

We at the Finger Lakes Bone and Joint Centers are glad patients are asking.

The human body does indeed need calcium. Over 99% of the calcium in our bodies is used to build our bones and teeth. However, the amount of calcium that is in our bodies depends greatly on how much calcium we absorb through our diet (Wardlaw and Hampl 404). How well our body absorbs calcium also depends on the Vitamin D that’s present. This is often why you see milk fortified with Vitamin D—it helps in calcium absorption.

The human body typically absorbs about a quarter of the calcium we ingest. That being said, young people (and particularly women who are pregnant and infants) absorb calcium much more efficiently than older adults, such as those who are in their late sixties and onwards. Postmenopausal women have been reported to have the least calcium absorption (405).

Because the human body tends to decrease its calcium absorption, doctors and dietitians recommend calcium supplements to encourage the appropriate absorption rate. So, for instance, while an average adult (a person over the age of 18) is expected to have a daily value of 1000 mg of calcium in their diet, people over the age of 70 are encouraged to have a daily value of 1200 mg (Brown 476). Hence, calcium supplements really give our bodies an extra opportunity to take in as much calcium as possible. Like with milk, you’ll often find calcium supplements that include Vitamin D as part of their compound makeup to help encourage maximum calcium absorption, which again, is about 25% of what you’re actually ingesting.

Alright, so we need to increase calcium intake in our diets as we age. But, why? Well, that 99% of calcium contributed to your bones and teeth isn’t a permanent thing, but it’s always in motion. That other small percentage of calcium that isn’t in our bones and teeth is being used in our bloodstream. Remember how earlier we said that all cells in the body need calcium? That’s very true, and our body is willing to sacrifice it from our bones so that our heart, muscles, and nerves receive that much needed calcium. Certain cells in our bodies, osteoclasts, exist to break down the calcium in our bones if we aren’t getting enough calcium through our diet (Wardlaw and Hampl 406). Other cells, osteoblasts, then work to rebuild the missing bone. Hence, our bones are constantly breaking down and regenerating, which is why whenever we break bones, we can heal again. However, this only happens if we have sufficient amounts of calcium for our bodies to work with.

So now it all comes together: if a person breaks a bone, a boost in calcium helps slow the eroding actions of the osteoclasts and instead helps the osteoblasts repair the damage, all while the other cells in our body are still getting their required serving of calcium as well. The same goes for older adults: by increasing the amounts of calcium in our diets, such as through supplements, we help the osteoblasts build and keep the osteoclasts from eating away at the calcium deposits in our bones.

Here’s the big question that has to be on everyone’s mind: what about Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis literally translates into “porous bone,” and that pretty much gives an accurate visual. Osteoporosis happens to both men and women, however it’s more prevalent in women due to the fact that men typically have larger bodies and denser bone mass (Brown 497). Since women usually have smaller bodies and lighter bone mass, osteoporosis tends to hit women sooner. Osteoporosis can be delayed by consuming the recommended amount of calcium (1000-1200 mg) during youth as well as leading an active lifestyle. Those osteoblasts mentioned earlier can actually work harder whenever bones experience weight-bearing or resistance exercises. The additional stress and pressure put on bones puts the osteoblasts to work to reinforce bone density, and thereby creating stronger bones that take a longer time to break down when our bodies stop absorbing calcium as efficiently from our diets. Athletes don’t often tend to experience osteoporosis in their old age because of the healthy bone strengthening they did during their prime calcium absorbing days.

If you’re a person between the ages of 18-30, now is the prime time of your life to really work on strengthening your bones and working to prevent brittle bones in your future. If you’re concerned about genetic factors or think you might be at risk for osteoporosis, contact the doctors at Finger Lakes Bone and Joint Centers to schedule a consultation about which supplements they recommend and how you can start taking care of your bones now.

Brown, Judith E. Nutrition Through the Life Cycle. 3rd Ed. Thomson Wadsworth, 2008.

Wardlaw, Gordon M. and Jeffrey S. Hampl. Perspectives in Nutrition. 7th Ed. McGraw Hill Higher Education, Boston, 2007.

Martin, Laura J., and David Zieve. “Calcium Blood Test.” MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia. NIH U.S. National Library of Medicine, n.d. Web. 27 Aug. 2016.

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